Home Provides a Sanctuary During These Unsettled Times

Everyone has been affected by the events of this year – the pandemic, civil unrest following the death of George Floyd, economic upheaval, the list goes on. Alliance Housing serves very low-income people who have been hit even harder than many of us. Our older and disabled residents are dealing with social isolation and not being able to gather in public spaces like the library, or even go shopping. Our single and family residents who were making ends meet before the economic downturn caused by COVID-19 are now struggling due to loss of work, or reduction of hours. Or they continue to work, but in jobs that place them in harm’s way, dealing directly with the public or at-risk clients such as in nursing homes, daycares, and takeout windows, while the rest of us are safely working from home or in a controlled office environment. Some hold multiple and temporary jobs, trying to keep afloat. Others sell their plasma or borrow money from family and friends. Some have even pursued getting new jobs during this time, looking for a brighter future.

In 2017, before living in her Alliance duplex, Desiree and her three boys, then aged 8 and 4-year-old twins, lived in a house on the North Side. Her bills were high, and her pay was low. Inevitably, they lost their home, and Desiree and the boys ended up living in her truck for over a month. During that time, one of the twins was hospitalized in the NICU unit for two weeks. Desiree would park her truck, her home, near the hospital to spend time with her son, and hope that the truck would be there when she returned.


On October 1, 2017, a date that is etched in Desiree’s memory, she got a call from Alliance’s property manager Bob Bono. Alliance had a home for her. She couldn’t stop crying. The family moved into their home on 22nd and Upton Avenue North on October 4, 2017. And on October 7th, her son came home from the NICU, not to the truck, but to a real home. The unit is a nice size for her family. They can look out the picture window and get a view of their neighborhood. Desiree has been working at the front desk of a motel for three years. Although she feels lucky to have a job, Desiree is worried about being out in public and being exposed to the virus, and then putting her children at risk. She rides the bus to and from work, about a 35 minute ride each way, and a further risk of exposure to the virus. And even though travel is down due to the virus, her motel is full; full of medical workers isolating from their own families to keep them safe, and full of homeless people, reminding her of her past life before she and her children moved into their Alliance home.

In the spring, Desiree sometimes had to take her children with her to work because there was no where else for them to be since
school was online. Finally she asked her family for help. Her older sister worked with her older 10-year-old, and the father of the
six-year-old twins took on their schooling. This arrangement has continued this school year. Despite the stress of providing for and raising her children during a pandemic, Desiree benefits from knowing that she has a safe and secure home. She admits that she has depression and anger issues, but that she hasn’t “gone off on anyone” since she moved into her Alliance home. She says the organization is a good one for a single mom, and “if you ever get the chance, go to Alliance (Housing).”

 

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